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you need the right balance of charm and swagger to pull it off."s Pazz & Jop annual critics' poll ranked "Blurred Lines" at number four to find the best music of 2013, tied with Kanye West's "New Slaves".On the other hand, Rob Sheffield of Rolling Stone named the song "The Worst Song of This or Any Other Year." "Blurred Lines" peaked at number one in 25 countries, including the United Kingdom, Australia, Republic of Ireland, France, Germany, Austria, Italy, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Poland, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, becoming Thicke's highest charting song in all of these countries.This is the second time that director Diane Martel and Pharrell join together for a music video project involving two differently rated versions. After being on the site for just under one week, the unrated version of the video was removed from You Tube on March 30, 2013, citing violations of the site's terms of service that restricts the uploading of videos containing nudity, particularly if used in a sexual context.During a Q&A for Grantland Diane Martel explained that her desire was "to make videos that sell records" and "not to make videos that express my own obsessions, but to make videos that move units." Martel at first turned down the offer to direct the video after being told there could be no nudity but agreed to direct when it was decided to shoot two versions. Martel favorably referred to the large hashtags that flash throughout the video as "awkward" and noted she enjoyed their obstructive quality.The Michigan Daily's Jackson Howard graded it an "A" and praised it as "one of Pharrell's best beats in years ...by the time the multilayered and carnal harmonies of the chorus come in, the song is completely on fire." Digital Spy's Lewis Corner, who gave the song three out of five stars, was more wary of the single and remarked: "It's a subject that when in the right hands can be smooth and soulful, but in the wrong, crass and chauvinistic ...

This has led to the song being banned at universities and other institutions in the United Kingdom and prompted a rebuttal from Thicke.

The fashion in which the women in the video are dressed was in part inspired by the work of photographer Helmut Newton.

When asked about what references she drew from for the video, Martel cited the ballets of George Balanchine as performed by the New York City Ballet, noting their minimalism, as well as the work of Richard Avedon.

He and I would go back and forth where I'd sing a line and he'd be like, "Hey, hey, hey!

" We started acting like we were two old men on a porch hollering at girls like, "Hey, where you going, girl? " Feldstein told Hit Quarters: "We had an artist that had never had a hit on radio.

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