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By this narrow definition they found that 66.8% of respondents reported receiving comprehensive sex education, 23.8% reported abstinence-only, and 9.4% reported no sex education.

However, no information was available about the quality, context, or duration of either the abstinence-only or comprehensive sex education programs.

The researchers analyzed data from 1,719 heterosexual respondents to the NSFG who were 15–19. The authors focused on young people’s answers to two questions: whether they had received “any formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place about how to say no to sex” before the age of 18 and whether they had received any formal education about birth control.

Young people who reported only receiving information on how to say no to sex were classified as participants in abstinence-only programs and young people who reported getting both messages were classified as having received comprehensive sex education.

Suggested questions for guiding a discussion are included. option=com_content&task=view&id=219&Itemid=129 Source: ETR RECAPP Website Target Audience: Level IV (adolescence, ages 15-18; high school) Topic: Romantic Relationships and Dating Duration of Lesson: 1 hour 20 minutes (Part I, 30 minutes; Part II, 50 minutes) Date Published: 2002 Summary: This learning activity is designed to help youth understand the risks of unprotected sex and learn about contraceptive options.

Participants group into teams to resolve an assigned case study and present their solution to the entire group.

To view this lesson click here: Source: Advocates for Youth Target Audience: Level IV (adolescence, ages 15 through 18, high school) Topic: Romantic Relationships and Dating Duration of Lesson: 40 to 50 minutes Date Published: Undated Summary: This lesson examines how gender roles affect relationships and explores situations where gender roles and stereotypes might affect teen’s goals, decisions and relationships.

To view this lesson click here: Source: ETR Re CAPP Website, adapted from ETR’s Reducing The Risk Target Audience: Level III (early adolescence, ages 12 through 15; middle school/junior high school) and IV (adolescence, ages 15 through 18; high school) Duration of Lesson: 25 to 55 Minutes Date Published: 1999 Summary: In this participatory activity that focuses on postponing sexual activity, students observe the teacher demonstrate role-plays and students then practice delaying skills in role-play situations.It also confirmed that talking to young people about birth control does not lead to increased sexual activity or higher STD rates as many critics of comprehensive sexuality education continue to claim.This study is a welcome addition to the research on sexuality education and youth sexual behavior; however, there are some limitations to the data.More importantly, however, it confirms that programs that teach young people about both abstinence and contraception/disease prevention are, in fact, effective.In particular, the authors found that receiving information about birth control in formal sex education was associated with a 50% lower risk of teen pregnancy when compared to receiving information only on abstinence.Source: Pamela Kohler, et al., “Abstinence-Only and Comprehensive Sex Education and the Initiation of Sexual Activity and Teen Pregnancy,” SIECUS Analysis: This study adds to the growing body of research in support of a comprehensive approach to sexuality education.

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